COFA SXSW Panel Submissions

Monday, August 19, 2019

CREATIVITY IS THE NEW BLACK

Dean Doug Dempster

Learn more about how companies like IBM, AT&T and Disney Imagineering are turning to arts schools to recruit and cultivate their talent pipelines. The College of Fine Arts at The University of Texas at Austin is partnering with these companies to create responsive curriculum that allows students to apply the creative skills they’re learning in a real-world context and to train students for the jobs of the future. Vote here.

THE EXPERIENCE ECONOMY IS HERE, GET READY FOR IT

Jan Ryan, Executive Director of Entrepreneurship and Innovation

Digital and physical worlds are merging together which is changing experience expectations - everything from brand and employee to customer expectation of their company interactions. Customers and employees are making their brand decisions based on the experiences companies deliver - they are looking beyond the product, and making comparisons across industries. Employees expect digital-first information and company cultures that put their experiences first. Shoppers and customers expect companies to have the latest and best experiences - making every online and physical interaction personally relevant to them. The cohesion of physical and digital experiences is driving new expectations in loyalty, retention and satisfaction. Vote here. 

INVESTING IN INNOVATION THROUGH CREATIVITY

Jan Ryan, Executive Director of Entrepreneurship and Innovation

In this panel, we feature an array of entrepreneurs, creative professionals and investors in the creative space. These individuals come from different areas of expertise, but they all share one thing in common: investing in creativity. Our panel hopes to give viewers a behind the scenes look at some of your favorite artistic experiences and explain both the importance and thought process behind investing in the arts. Creativity stimulates innovation across all fields. This panel will help people understand the crucial link between creativity and entrepreneurship. Possible topics may include: Investing in documentaries, music, fine art and new media. Vote here

DIGITAL MEDIA IN PUBLIC ART: RISKS AND REWARDS

Andrée Bober, Director of Landmarks

Public Art 2.0: The Risks and Rewards of Presenting Digital Works in the Public Realm 
The ways that artists use and respond to technology in their creative practice changes as rapidly as technology itself. In this panel, internationally-recognized artists Ben Rubin and Jennifer Steinkamp will examine the risks and rewards of presenting and maintaining digital art in the public sphere. Adding a programmatic perspective, the discussion will also feature Andrée Bober, director of Landmarks, the public art program for the University of Texas at Austin, and Steven Sacks, founder and director of bitforms gallery in New York. Vote here. 

 

ESCAPING DOOM: TRANSFORMING SCIENCE INTO EXPERIENCE

Doreen Lorenzo, Assistant Dean of School of Design and Creative Technologies

We know that climate change is real. Data is the language of science, however, data alone is often incomprehensible to the average person. This panel and our real-life experiential escape room makes scientific findings accessible and encourages informed discussion and decision making by all. At UT Austin, leveraging existing data and expertise, we're developing an escape room to explore how scientific research can be integrated into an engaging, entertaining and educational storytelling experience. Vote here. 

DESIGN THE LEARNING SPACE OF THE FUTURE

Julie Schell, Executive Director of Extended and Executive Education

How might we design the classroom of the future? In this fun, hands-on workshop, a designer and a learning scientist will guide you on a futuristic journey to explore imaginary classroom environments. Through playful, design thinking activities, we will co-create wild, fantasy-like spatial concepts and classroom setups. Expect to take your future-forward visions and translate them directly to real-world classrooms to drive student engagement, belonging, and social-emotional learning. Vote here. 

GETTING STUDENTS CAREER READY WITH DESIGN THINKING

Julie Schell, Executive Director of Extended and Executive Education

Are you an educator working to ready students to succeed in the future? How can you when the 21st-century workplace is continuously evolving? Design thinking may offer a way forward. Gain tips for helping students thrive in the global workforce from a panel of international design educators. Come learn specific strategies for leveraging design thinking to help drive employability and career readiness for the next generation while democratizing access to design and cultivating new talent. Vote here. 

A HISTORIAN, CPA AND SCIENTIST WALK INTO A BAR...

Gray Garmon, Director of Center for Integrated Design

How do interdisciplinary teams work together and solve wicked problems? At the Center for Integrated Design at UT Austin, we teach design methodologies as a foundational skill to enable interdisciplinary students to creatively collaborate on real-world challenges. Our classes are open to any major, and students learn to integrate design practices into their own disciplines by focusing on new mindsets and tools to solve difficult and messy problems that are relevant to our campus. Vote here

HOW TO MAKE A DESIGN DEGREE MATTER

Kate Canales, Chair of Dept of Design

Reconstructing decades-old curriculum is not easy, and launching new programs inside the academy may be even harder. In the age of interdisciplinary learning and human-centered thinking, we owe it to our students to provide a curriculum that is responsive to the time and place in which they graduate, which means updating, redesigning and sometimes even starting over. Kate will discuss how interdisciplinary curriculums can be re-imagined for undergraduates, graduate students and medical students. Vote here

ICE BREAKERS: WHY UNCOMFORTABLE CAN BE INGENIOUS

Kate Canales, Chair of Dept of Design

Let’s be honest, either you love them or you hate them. When successfully facilitated, ice breakers or warm-up games (which we sometimes call “stokes”) can lead to stronger team building and simple, more effective outcomes at meetings. The very reason they make us uncomfortable is the reason they work: they break down barriers and help us connect with each other in new ways. Athletic coaches never send their players out onto the field without a warm-up. It should be the same for meetings and classes. We’ll equip you with ways to execute successful icebreakers and become a stronger leader and team player. And we promise you a few laughs along the way. Vote here

VISUALIZING THE VISCERAL

Yuliya Lanina, Assistant Professor of Practice

Technology gives us powerful new tools for enhancing our experience. It also distracts us and drives us apart. In our session, we will discuss how and why it is important for visual and sound artists, composers, and performers to take charge in creating technologically driven audio-visual immersive experiences that recapture art as a transformative experience that can bring people together. We will discuss ways to make these experiences meaningful, complex, and multidimensional. We will also examine creative strategies for the artist as a performer interacting with technology, exploring how to enrich the overall experience. Vote here. 

PROMPT: SOCIALLY ENGAGING OBJECTS AND ENVIRONMENTS

Tamie Glass, Associate Professor 

We spend more than 90% of our time inside. Despite their potential, interiors and their contents often serve as an overlooked backdrop to our lives. How can the places where we live, work, and play be more engaging? As advancements in technology cause social isolation, how can spaces teach people to be human again? This interactive, visually rich session will answer these questions and demystify psychosocial principles of human behavior. Gain a designer’s perspective on how to cultivate social interactions that leverage technology, environments, and objects. Participants will identify behavioral prompts using case studies and practice applying them to their own spaces. Whether you’re planning, designing, or just curious—come learn how to increase your connection with the world around you. Vote here

"IT'S GREAT EXPOSURE" PAY EQUITY IN THE ARTS

Matt Smith, Assistant Professor of Practice

The academic institution is successful at educating and developing artists. But across industries, artists are underpaid, overworked, and struggling to make ends meet. Reexamining the role of the academy is key in reaching fair pay for artists. This panel will discuss the academic institution’s role in developing artists for fair pay, unpaid internships for college students, and the academic institution’s role in challenging the systemic pay gap for artists. Vote here. 

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